kayliesaurus rex

art-of-swords:

Swords in Art - Modern Samurai, Musketeer and Knight

  • by Adrian Dadich

(Source: adriandadich, via babybutta)

boyirl:

Erica Sakurazawa

i love this comic

boyirl:

Erica Sakurazawa

i love this comic

(via babybutta)

shout out to minimum wage workers have to work on labor day so folks with cushy desk jobs can have the day off.

babybutta:

!

(Source: nowsoonlater)

otterbrains:

pagingme:

lulz-time:

I actually can’t cope with this

LOOK AT ITS CUTE LIL TAIL DOING THE WIGGLE WAGGLE THING

!!!

(Source: lepipehd, via sparklebat)

theblanknotebook:

Your Body Is Beautiful And You Are A G o d d e s s 

Reblogging again because YES!

(Source: thewaywardqueen, via babybutta)

robpowellillustration:

Doing some late night coloring.

robpowellillustration:

Doing some late night coloring.

(via nickmarino)

prynnette:

I love comics. Frequently, it doesn’t feel like they love me back—but I, like most fans, can take it. I can weather the bloated crossover events, the gimmicky romances, the deaths that you know won’t last before the bullet even leaves the gun. I can take artists who only draw three faces and X-TREME BLOODSHED and a million animal sidekicks.

But god almighty, I am so tired of crappy fashion in superhero comics.

Call it a nonissue. Call it a frivolous concern. I call it a massive missed opportunity and offer the critic an insouciant flip of my hair. When Bryan Lee O’Malley tweeted this a while back, I nearly stood up and cheered: “A cool thing about comics is FASHION = CHARACTER. you can convey personality through clothing. Why do 90% of western artists ignore this.” He gets it—and unsurprisingly, Scott Pilgrim is one of the only Western comics I can think of that uses fashion to effectively convey characterization. Through a character’s clothes, the reader gleans insight into their insecurities, ambitions, social status and more—y’know, the basics of subtle characterization. The titular Scott is a slacker geek dude in reference-happy t-shirts and jeans. Flighty, jaded Ramona is a mercurial hipster pixie with ever-changing hair. Wry Wallace Wells dons monogrammed polos and boxer briefs. Knives Chau starts out a meek schoolgirl in kilts and an overgrown ponytail, then graduates to a slightly-less-innovative version of Ramona’s wardrobe and a big red streak in her hair when trying to win back Scott’s affections. The cast of background characters actually look like the Vertigo-reading, concert-going, Banksy-coffee-table-book owning chic geek set of today and the story is more emotionally resonant because of this immersive realism. THIS MATTERS, YOU GUYS.

But year after year after year, the comics industry ignores it. Male characters are dressed as blandly as possible, or come clad in weird, baggy approximations of early 2000s fashion. Female characters exist in a world where—surprise!—most clothes are tight and sexy, albeit oddly out of date and in clashing colors. Their civilian lives seem more flat and unreal as a result, their emotional entanglements more eyeroll-inducing  because honestly, they look like the cast of an old daytime soap. Fashion impacts our lives every day, at every turn—we judge people based on what they wear, where they wear it, and where they bought it, even if we aren’t consciously doing it. When I say I want more thoughtful fashion in comics, I don’t mean that I need every character looking like they stepped off a runway—I mean that I want comic creators to think about who their characters are, what they would be most likely to wear, where they would buy it, their relationship to their body, and how they want the world to see them. I want them to think about their characters on a deeper level. I want them to make good comics.

Good examples of fashion in comics are so rare that I remember them by individual issue, and one such example comes to mind now. Cliff Chiang is a fantastic artist in general, and as I discovered at San Diego Comic-Con 2013, a pretty stylish dude himself. His current work on Wonder Woman features a lot of mindful clothes, but it’s a comic he illustrated in 2010 that really comes to mind. Brave and the Bold #33 featured a melancholy story about Zatanna foreseeing Barbara Gordon’s wheelchair-bound future, thus inspiring her to take Babs and Wonder Woman out for a ladies night of dancing and drinking. It’s a lovely issue for a lot of reasons, but I found myself truly impressed by the way he dresses the three women for their night on the town. They each wear cocktail dresses that actual real life women would wear today, but moreover, each dress fits each woman. Barbara, pretty young thing that she is, sports a hot pink bandage dress. Zatanna’s look is, appropriately, a little more witchy and avant-garde. Diana wears a draped piece that incorporates more structured, Grecian elements without screaming IT’S WONDER WOMAN SHE’S A GREEK AMAZON, GET IT?! It captures who they are, how they see themselves, and the world they live in simply  and succinctly and the issue shines because of it.

Fashion matters. Clothes matter. They inform our social lives, our self image, our class consciousness and our goals. Comic creators owe it to their art to care about this more—there’s a reason other entertainment industries devote entire departments of people to this task. For now, we wait—cringing at a world where every female character owns thirty midriff tops, every little girl has pigtails and puffed sleeves and men can only be the Everyman Hero in jeans or the Billionaire Hero in a generic business suit.

(via loveisthenewpunk)

"The first step to loving yourself is recognising that it’s taken you your whole life to learn to hate yourself."
- Prof. Chapman, illustrating the size of the job. The scale of the problem. (via mediumdensity)

(via afatfox)

lilylilymine:

Colored my Helga Crumb drawing from the other day! I tried to color in Rotodisk’s beautiful style, but I can’t figure out her technique! She’s so good. Anyway I like how it came out :D (ps here is one with a pastel green BG not sure how i like it. hmm.)

whoa, awesome job, Jessi! :D love her cute, thick legs!

lilylilymine:

Colored my Helga Crumb drawing from the other day! I tried to color in Rotodisk’s beautiful style, but I can’t figure out her technique! She’s so good. Anyway I like how it came out :D (ps here is one with a pastel green BG not sure how i like it. hmm.)

whoa, awesome job, Jessi! :D love her cute, thick legs!

thebsdboys:

OK first you’re being a total dick right now,

thebsdboys:

OK first you’re being a total dick right now,

(via piddlebucket)

sparklebat:

sparklebat:

Cherry Crush Issue 1: Friendship is officially available for purchase (print and PDF)!!! 

Cherry Crush is a bimonthly lifestyle zine that aims to be all inclusive and celebrate all different kinds of people and experiences. We especially want to showcase those whose voices may not be heard or those whose tastes are not appealed to by the average magazine. Cherry Crush is a zine about anything and everything. Each issue revolves around a different, central theme. We love all things DIY and creative so we look to feature independent artists and creators in every issue.

This isn’t your average photo-copied zine. Cherry Crush features a radiant full color cover and back with exclusive illustrations made especially for each issue. The cover is printed on 32 pound paper and has a lovely sheen to it. The rest of the zine is printed on 24 pound paper in lush black, white, and grays.

Buy Issue 0, Issue 1, or a Cherry Crush one-year subscription at our Etsy: www.etsy.com/shop/cherrycrushzine

Visit and ‘like’ us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/cherrycrushzine

Please signal boost and spread the word!

We also have a very easy CONTEST going on right now where you can win FREE STUFF to celebrate the first issue about friendship. All you have to do is submit a photo of you and your friend(s) to our email cherrycrushzine@gmail.com or Facebook page by 11:59 pm (EST) August 31st. On October 1st we will post the submitted photos to an album on our Facebook page where for one week, everyone can vote by ‘like’ing their favorite photo! The photo with the most ‘like’s wins special, exclusive prizes! Don’t miss out!

Support independent and local artists. Support zines. Celebrate friendship! 

bycrom:

bycrom:

By Crom! is my joke-a-panel autobiographical comic featuring life advice and spiritual guidance from Conan the Barbarian. It ran from January 2012 to May 2014, and is collected in two books, The Collected By Crom! and Full Colour Cromulence. You can read the archives on WealdComics.com, and grab the books in print and in PDF.

By Crom! will be tabling with Weald Comics at TCAF, VanCAF, TAAFI and possibly FanExpo Toronto!

Hello new followers! Welcome! Here’s an overview of By Crom! for you all!

If you’re looking for By Crom! this fall, you can catch me flailing excitedly around GenCon with some postcards and high fives but no table, or you can come to booth a287 at FanExpo in Toronto for all the books and prints and originals a true barbarian could desire. 

Cromulent Summer Reruns have been running here on By Crom!, having now completed a rerun of the full first zine. We’re taking a short break and will be back on the 21st with reruns from The Collected By Crom!.

Thank you all so much for all your support here! It’s been a wild ride and I’m touched that you’re touched by all Conan’s “weirdly inspirational” advice!

(via anderjak)

commission of Glory from Shadowrun: Dragonfall, which i’m guessing is a game? i have no idea but this character seems pretty cool.

commission of Glory from Shadowrun: Dragonfall, which i’m guessing is a game? i have no idea but this character seems pretty cool.

littlefroggies:

Wanted to draw warmup sketch of sexy girlfriends but also something funny so…. so I did both
god i want a pizza bra

omg i want a pizza bra so baaaaad

littlefroggies:

Wanted to draw warmup sketch of sexy girlfriends but also something funny so…. so I did both

god i want a pizza bra

omg i want a pizza bra so baaaaad